Tag Archives: self-publishing

Personal Post: The Year That Was 2017

Is it a sign I’m getting older that my first thought is about how quickly the year has gone? Probably. But here we are on the cusp on 2018 and I find myself at that point in the year when I look back and see what I can learn before moving forward.

Lesson 1 – The best laid plans…

I spent the early part of 2017 setting up my life so I could become entirely location independent. Armed with a laptop, all I needed was a decent wifi connection and I was good to go. I got to spend months in the sun, living the dream and writing. Then, happily but ironically, circumstances have changed so that for the next two years I have virtually no choice but to be tied to that place called home.

Lesson 2 – Marketing makes no sense…

Never trust anyone who promises you a fool-proof system to fame or money. Whether it’s sales, platform building, advertising models or social media, no one has all the answers. In a world that is rapidly transitioning towards entrepreneurs and gig economies, there are more scammers out there than there are genuine business minds.

Lesson 3 – It’s all about helping others…

I’ve done some amazing things this year. But the thing that has given me the most satisfaction is hearing from people who have found The Realist’s Guide To Sugar Free useful. Some of the Amazon reviews have been amazing and I am so very grateful. It was because of this I wrote The Realist’s Guide To Resolutions. There are so many self-help achievement books out there that are really boring for the vast majority of readers. I happen to love them. So, once again, I studied, distilled and made a light and fun read for other people to get the benefits without having to wade through books that are, ultimately, trying to get business people to buy consulting services.

Looking forward…

I’ve come to realise that the main thing is about being happy with what matters to you. It’s not about being what other people expect you to be. If I can continue to stay true to myself in 2018, help others along the way and take it some spectacular sunsets, then I’ll be fine.

Whatever you want from 2018, I wish you every success.

The Realist’s Guide To Resolutions – How To Set Goals and Stay Motivated In The Real World

If you want to stop smoking, lose weight, get fitter, improve your career prospects or simply finish a project that’s been hanging around on your to do list for the past ten years, this book will give you the kick up the backside you’ve been looking for.

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Top 5 podcasts for writers of 2017

Over 2017, podcasts remained one of my favourite forms of entertainment and education. Thinking about this post, I couldn’t help but wonder if there would be any changes from my Top 5 of 2016. Or – even more impressively – if any from my Top 5 of 2014 would make it back onto the list.

To kick us off, returning for the second year: Cortexbroadcast_artwork_cortex_artwork

“CGP Grey and Myke Hurley are both independent content creators. Each episode, they discuss the methods and tools they employ to be productive and creative.”

Despite the not-a-schedule schedule being even more erratic this year, I’ve still looked forward to getting the alert that a new episode has arrived. For independent creatives in any field, Cortex is a conversation between friends about productivity, efficiency and a new way of working. Plus, someone gave me a knowing look and a ‘nice Cortex T-shirt’ comment at a hotel breakfast buffet this year and it made my day. Honestly, it’s not as creepy as it sounds. Monkey brain wins every time.

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The only podcast to have featured on all previous lists is the amazing Writing Excuses.

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“Fifteen minutes long, because you’re in a hurry, and we’re not that smart.”

Although the number of writing podcasts on my app of choice (Overcast, if you’re interested) has increased this year, this is still the best one out there dedicated to craft. This year there have been a number of co-hosts who bring new perspectives. Although I miss hearing from the main hosts sometimes, I would much rather that than have no weekly podcast at all. Whether you’re still working on your first draft or if you’re a seasoned professional, there really is something in here for everyone.

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Sticking with a writing theme, Creative Penn podcast has been a great resource and a show I’ve consistently listened to over the course of the year.

“Interviews, inspiration and information on writing and creativity, publishing options, book marketing and creative entrepreneurship”

It is much less craft-focused than Writing Excuses, but still manages to stand out in a tough field of shows that want to teach you how you can make a living with your writing. I’ve discovered that most of them are seriously geared towards getting you to buy the premium course that shows you how. This is less pushy (maybe because it’s more British?), which I prefer, especially as there’s still lots of useful information and some very interesting guests.

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Writing related, but in a different way, I have a brand new stationery podcast making it onto the list this year in the form of the RSVP podcast.

“A podcast about stationery and so much more!”

What started off as an April Fool’s one-off episode on the Erasable podcast (also worth checking out if you’re a fan of writing by hand, specifically with graphite – yes that is still a thing), became a podcast of its own. In a world full of default male voices, it has been fantastic to hear these three women bring a fresh spin on things. Plus, they don’t have a problem with calling out BS, drinking fine beverages and smashing the patriarchy, so what’s not to love?

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Finally, in a very different  style, The Tim Ferriss Show is another overall favourite of 2017.

“Each episode, I deconstruct world-class performers from eclectic areas to extract the tactics, tools, and routines you can use.”

The thing I love about Tim and his products, be they books, videos or podcasts, is that nothing is off limits. As someone who loves to try new and inventive ways of life hacking, the wide range of topics always keeps me interested. Almost everything out on the internet is as niched down and specific as possible, but Tim constantly surprises me with some of the people he interviews and the experiments he’s prepared to try. I come away with something worth pondering every single episode and that’s pretty unusual.

So those are my top five podcasts of 2017. Some new ones and two old ones, but all of them worth checking out, especially if you’re a writer, creative, entrepreneur, life-hacker or simply enjoy damn fine audio.

2018: How to do more and worry less

As we hurtle towards the end of 2017, it’s inevitable that we start to look back over the year and ahead towards the new one. It’s a time of hope and dreams. It’s a shame then, that such determination and promise for the future only rolls around once a year.

I love personal improvement books. I’ve read hundreds of them by this point. But most people don’t. I can’t blame anyone for that. They’re notoriously dry and you have to dig through hundreds of pages to find the four really useful paragraphs they contain. You already know what I decided to do about it, right? Ta-dah!

The working title for this book was ‘goal setting for normal people’. It was never going to be the final name, but during the writing process I wanted to keep in mind the heart of what it should be about. Quite simply, to take the wisdom of those hundreds of books I’ve read, along with research papers, personal experiences and the behavioural lessons learned from writing The Realist’s Guide To Sugar Free. Then put it in an easy to read, useful and actionable book.

So what’s in it?

Plenty of information, without all the waffle and buzzwords. Things such as:

  • How to set the right goals for you (and not feel guilty about the ones you don’t)
  • How to plan for success (beyond the first week)
  • How to hack your brain to do this smarter not harder (great if you struggle with motivation and willpower)
  • How to track progress and level up (so you can continually dream bigger)

The Realist’s Guide To Resolutions will be published on December 28th. I wanted to make it available for those people who like to take advantage of the downtime between Christmas and New Year, or prefer to start the year with the thinking already done.

I’ve got my own yearly review day booked in for December 29th. I’ll consume several cups of very nice coffee, read the letter I wrote to myself at this time last year and write the one to open next year. I’ll look back at all the things I’ve done (fond memories of my four month sabbatical by the sea) and work out what I need to do to make next year even better. No doubt I’ll be slightly daunted by the sheer number of notebooks I’ve filled over the course of the year. My guess is upwards of twenty. Gulp.

If you’d rather wait until the festivities are out of the way and 2018 has arrived, then the pre-order will be delivered to your device for when you’re ready to start.

Like Sugar-Free, it’s a quick and easy read, with a dash of humour thrown in. It’s also reasonably priced (only 0.99 in most regions!) so you can get the most bang for your (literal) buck.

Here’s to a fantastic 2018, whatever that means for you.

The Realist’s Guide To Resolutions is available for Pre-order at Amazon.co.uk (or go to Amazon.com to jump to other regions)

Upcoming Offer

For those in the US, the kindle version of The Realist’s Guide To Sugar Free  will be discounted to 99c for New Year (December 29-January 4).

Top 5 blogs of 2017 for creatives

I’ve got a few ‘top 5’ posts coming up to round off what has been an unusual and exciting year. One of the first subjects that came to mind was this one, the 5 blogs I have found most useful during 2017.

It was only as I started really thinking about what they were that I realised that actually, I’ve moved away from blogs as a resource. I’m not sure if this is a trend, or whether I’ve just had a change in circumstances. Instead of having favourite sites I return to time and time again, I’ve instead been more likely to search by subject and consume a variety of blogs I find. The chances of me returning to any specific site are slim.

Perhaps, unfortunately, it has something to do with how fake news (actual fake news, which is generally the polar opposite of what is being branded fake news) has got me second guessing everything. Instead of taking any one person or comapany’s view as truth anymore, I find myself always verifying sources. I suspect that 2018 will contain more of the same.

However, I did manage to find 5 blogs that I have returned to more than others. Unsurprisingly, these cover my main interests of writing, travel and how to stay productive and healthy.

 

The Creative Penn

Joanna Penn has quite the enterprise going now. There’s a lot of really useful information on the Creative Penn website and I find myself returning to it frequently. Bridging art and commerce, Joanna’s site is future thinking and always optimistic, no matter what craziness and uncertainty exists in the world. She’s making money from people wanting to be authors, but she’s up front about expecting money in exchange for valuable insights, rather than being a ‘get rich quick on kindle’ scammer.

Goins, Writer

Jeff Goins has made a career from writing about writing. When you look at his work about work it all sort of gets a bit meta, but there’s a lot of important takeaways included. The concept that actually, in today’s world we are moving away from a single-track career progression and into a varied career of diverse options, is something that has really resonated with me this year. As I look towards 2018 this site has been great at reminding me to keep my options open, embrace opportunities and ignore the imposter syndrome.

Chris The Freelancer

Admittedly I tend to watch Chris’s videos on YouTube more frequently than I visit his blog. He’s built quite the channel about working from a laptop while he travels the world. He was one of the first resources I came across while looking at the way the world is gradually turning towards a laptop, gig based economy. Unlike many digital nomad sources, he has a professional approach, steering away from the backpacker with a side-hustle content that forms much of the information out there.

Pick The Brain

The banners at the top of this site cover off all the things near and dear to my heart: motivation, productivity, health, self-improvement. It focuses on doing the things required to move you forward to a dream life, but isn’t all about the hustle. Productivity is great, but not as a way of doing even more so you can burn yourself out. Instead, a healthy momentum is the name of the game. Even when the information isn’t new to me, it always acts as a good reminder to stop and think.

Brain Pickings

Although it has a very similar title to the one above, it’s very different. With much longer pieces, it’s not full of snappy soundbites. There are no quick wins to take away here. Instead, the posts are more critical and philosophical. More academic, if you don’t mind me using that word. The insights are numerous, but you have to work for them. Honestly, in today’s world of short attention spans and instant gratification, I don’t think that’s a bad thing.

Books for writers: Shadows Beneath (Writing Excuses Anthology) review

With NaNoWriMo only a week away, instead of my usual ‘book for entrepreneurs’ review, I thought I would focus specifically on a book for writers.

Most writers (aspiring and published) have read Stephen King’s On Writing. I love that book, but most of the engaging content is the autobiographical stuff, rather than the writing parts. So I thought I would take a look at a much more hands on, practical book: Shadows Beneath: The Writing Excuses Anthology.

The book was released in 2014 and often gets overlooked as being a short story anthology, rather than a practical guide to writing. It follows the writing process of the four main Writing Excuses hosts from story concept to finished work. Side note, if you’re a writer and haven’t checked out the Writing Excuses Podcast then go there now. It’s one of the best ‘craft’ podcasts out there in a realm of marketing ones.

The first part of the book contains the completed short stories. This means that those who aren’t interested in the writing process can just enjoy reading some quality fiction. For writers, it is the second part that is interesting: the ‘making of’ section.

For each of the stories, we can read a transcript of the Writing Excuses episode where they brainstormed ideas. For people who wonder where ideas come from, this is gold in itself. Then there is the first draft of the story, transcripts of workshopping discussions and intermittent drafts and commentaries from the authors. Finally, there is a version showing all the edits from the first draft to the published edition, full of cuts and additions.

So why read this book?

During NaNoWriMo, the idea is to take an idea and write. Write each day and get 50,000 words down by the end of the month. Editing has no place here. Often at the end, we are left with 50,000 words that need some pretty serious work. Shadows Beneath is a great way to see that even without these crazy time pressures, the first draft is never perfect. It can be hard to imagine that our favourite, successful authors struggle to write a first draft and that it often doesn’t work. It can be hard to believe they reach out to others and say ‘hey, I’m struggling with this and could use some help’. This book will teach lessons in craft and development, but it also shows the spirit of community and encouragement.

Which, when you think about it, has always been at the heart of NaNoWriMo.

You can buy Shadows Beneath: The Writing Excuses Anthology here. If you can, I’d recommend getting the print edition, as it allows you to flip back and forth much easier when following the revision process.

The first week of my location independent experiment

I first heard the term digital nomad just over six months ago. It resonated straight away, as it fit with the lifestyle I’d been working towards for a long time. However, it definitely seemed populated by a younger demographic. Many of the articles and YouTube videos made me think of my time backpacking over a decade ago (and I was already in my late twenties then), rather than where I currently am in my life. The movement was also concentrated in South East Asia (Thailand, Cambodia and Indonesia), with a smaller grouping in South America (Chile, Mexico and Brazil).

So I sat down and worked out my list of requirements for an ideal work/life. I’d already made the decision to become location independent. It turned out that my requirements made a surprisingly small list:

  • Somewhere warm, near the sea
  • Preferably a balcony overlooking aforementioned sea
  • Good wifi
  • Affordable

    Writing with a view

Digital Nomad: Asia or Europe?

All of this was possible without travelling halfway around the world from England. I did that when I spent six months in New Zealand three years ago and it always felt just a little too distant for a long term base. Over time various Canary Island locations started to be mentioned by seasoned nomads who wanted to try somewhere different. Given that it was a location I’d visited a dozen times, it felt comfortable and right to make the move.

Virtually a private pool – awesome!

Know Thyself

The list I’d made certainly didn’t include city living. As most of my work is writing, I didn’t need to be in a coworking space either. So I could rule out any of the big (relatively speaking) cities such as Las Palmas. I want to be able to cook for myself, so I didn’t need a plethora of tasty but unhealthy restaurants to tempt me. I also wanted a view that would compel me to exercise…

The reward at the end of the running track

What I am saying is this: when asking yourself which location is right for you, don’t feel like you have to choose from the ones everyone else is talking about. Make your list of requirements and find what feels right for you. Chang Mai may be a digital nomad mecca, but if that’s not what you need, then it’s really not a problem to be somewhere else.

Freedom comes from constraint

I have spent my first week out here testing the lifestyle. I started with a mini-break because I was exhausted. In the two weeks leading up to the flight, I saw lots and lots of people. As an introvert, it left me with nothing in the tank. A few days of reading at the beach was just what I needed.

Next week the work gets serious. I set up a separate calendar in iCal just for work scheduling. I got the idea from Michael Hyatt about planning an ideal week to help constrain and focus your work life. It’ll be exciting to try that out in a full implementation now I am a master of my own schedule.

I’ve also had time to test what food is available and what works with the limited cooking facilities. Constraint is great here because it means I have to think about my food. Many studies have shown that planning meals removes the weakness that leads to junk being the quick and easy option if you’re making a decision when already hungry.

Time to explore (it’s not all work!)

For me, being location and lifestyle independent isn’t actually about ultimate flexibility. After a few years of business travel, I’m looking for structure more than anything else. But I get to determine that structure to allow for maximum effectiveness and happiness.

Hopefully I’ll be just as content after my first full work week as an independent author and freelancer!

Death of a salesman: The (not so) sweet truth about hotel breakfasts

Hopefully today was my last hotel breakfast for a long time. For nearly three years, I have spent at least one night each week in a hotel. I’ve stayed in some good places and some bad places. I have tried a lot of hotel breakfasts and at some point I might look forward to one again, but right now that seems impossible.

This kind of temptation each week? Exhausting!

So how do you stay healthy while traveling? It’s not easy at all. In unfamiliar surroundings, the default setting is to take the easiest option. Sticking to a healthy lifestyle – food or exercise – is a challenge of monumental proportions.

Most UK hotels offer a simple choice: cooked or continental. Cooked is usually more expensive as you have to pay for the privilege of someone heating your bacon until it is at least tepid (or the other option, so black and crispy you’re waiting for a CSI unit to come in and identify it). However, if you’re keeping your unhealthy fats low during the rest of the week, it is a low sugar option if you forgo the beans and ketchup. The same cannot be said for the continental option, with it’s all-you-can-eat high sugar cereal options, pastries and jams in every variety.

So, if you are trying to be healthy and wholesome, why not forgo the temptation and get a healthy breakfast to go instead? It’s quick, it’s easy, it has limited portions and it is marketed as a great start to your busy work day.

Quick, easy and healthy marketing? Alarm bells are ringing…

So, what do these packs typically contain and how much sugar does that translate into? I’ve researched a couple and below is a pretty accurate representation:

Cereal and milk (19g) OR fruit yoghurt (15g)
Muffin (25g)
Breakfast bar (12g)
Juice (20g)

This equals between 70-75g of sugar before you even start your day (that’s more than double the NHS recommended daily intake of 30g!). When you’ve got an early meeting, this can seem like a sensible choice, but it isn’t. Not to mention that it virtually guarantees a mid-morning slump that will have you reaching for another quick pick me up.

This persistent set of poor options is one of the reasons why I’ve decided to transition into a lifestyle where I can have more control not only of my work, but also my health. Research shows that health is one of the consistently de-prioritised areas of modern life, despite us understanding more than ever about exercise and nutrition benefits.

The healthy ‘to go’ breakfast, whether at a hotel or your favourite coffee chain, is just another marketing trap, so heed the warning and don’t be fooled!

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The Realist’s Guide To Sugar Free is available at Amazon (UK) and Amazon (US) in both ebook and paperback.

Love the book? Then please leave a review on Amazon. Reviews help keep the book visible, which means I can help more people make the change to a happier and healthier life.